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Terrain Collective Inc
2625 28th St. #110
Boulder, CO 80301

303.953.8620
we@pockitudes.com


P.O. Box 19551

Asheville, NC 28815-1551
USA

A Pockitude™ is a gratitude recorded in a pocket-sized journal. It’s choosing to focus on the better things, the things that remind you why it’s great to be alive. We all need consistent reminders of the good things, and writing them down as you see them is a great tool in your arsenal. The Pockitudes™ journal fits in your pockets and purses, so you can record your gratitudes as they come to you.

With a quick jot, you get a monumental shift on your outlook in life. We encourage you to write your gratitudes for just two weeks. See for yourself the benefits. See for yourself the change in your attitude. See for yourself how you will begin to discover the good in things, people, and places.

Join the happiness movement.

 

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A Pockitude™ is a gratitude recorded in a pocket-sized journal. It’s choosing to focus on the better things, the things that remind you why it’s great to be alive. See for yourself the change in your attitude, and how you will begin to discover the good in things, people, and places. With a quick jot, you get a shift in your attitude. 

Filtering by Tag: embodiment

When Gratitude Fails

Frederic Terral

Photo by  Zohre Nemati  on  Unsplash

It does happen, failure to feel grateful, I mean. There are times when our pain or anxiety is so strong, it’s less energy to surrender into the downward spiral than reach out and grab hold to stay afloat. Many of us have been in the darkness before, and the familiarity can be a comfort, despite all the pain it invokes. So, what happens when gratitude fails? What do we do when we’ve listed our gratitudes and we still feel terrible?

  1. Write about what’s bothering. Acknowledge it. Give voice to the pain and anger, and let it have its say. To move through our challenges, to heal, it is crucial we process what we are feeling, and especially write about it. Acknowledging the truth of where we are is a good first step. The blank page for reflections in our journals can be used for these moments. 

  2. Say "This too shall pass.” Impermanence, in all its difficulties, is also a promise that nothing lasts. We will get through it. If it’s particularly challenging, we can ask for help, call a friend, turn to our joy list, and give ourselves a break. No perfection here. Just progress.

  3. Come back to our senses. Literally. We don’t realize how much anxiety and tension we carry in our bodies. The energy gets trapped and our breath gets shallow. Our physical responses to fight or flight, anger and anxiety, sets the tone for us to ruminate and run circles in our mind. When we come back to the body, we allow our senses to take over and give ourselves the chance to physically shift our energy to a more gentle, peaceful state. Stay in it as long as you can. Give yourself this gift to let go of the mind and sink into your senses.

  4. Gratitude revisited. We can do steps one through three as many times as needed, but always come back to gratitude. Start with the simplest thing that helps you FEEL gratitude, not something that we think we should be grateful for. THIS IS IMPERATIVE. If gratitude is an obligation, just a task, a list, a consolation prize, then gratitude won’t work. Authentic gratitude is when we feel it stirring in our hearts, our body. It may even evoke emotion if it’s truly real. To cultivate a lasting practice of authentic gratitude, we must know it in our body first. 

Embodiment exercise: Find a place to sit and listen—preferably outside or by an open window. Tune in to the body and all its senses. Close the eyes or use a soft gaze. What do we see, hear, touch, feel, smell? Notice our breath. The moment our thoughts begin to wander, come back to the body, come back to what we see, feel, and hear. What do we notice? Has our breath slowed down, has our body relaxed? What’s still tight? The jaw perhaps, neck or shoulders. Relax them if they are tense. Repeat. 

Perfection is such an illusion. Being human means giving space for the difficult emotions, giving permission for resistance to happiness and the good things, but we must always be curious. The resistance to finding gratitude is information that something is wrong. Follow that thread and see if we can find out why.

Feel and know

Frederic Terral

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In the vast wildness and fluidity of my emotions, I have permission to embody every single one. Then, with loud, generous, borderline obnoxious conviction, I exhale them all free. I notice…what wants to be stifled, what wants to resist, when do I recoil? I ask….what braces, tightens, squeezes my body, what clenches my jaw, or stops me from breathing? I acknowledge…what is heavy or infuriating, what keeps me doubting, or groping in the dark. I employ…the bright shimmer that brings lightness, connection and laughter, the gratitude that grounds me firmly, and keeps me rooted in a raging storm.

As my emotions rise and fall, shape-shift and transmute, the space I give them to swim and breathe while excommunicating judgement and the swirly story my mind wants to tell, this is the very space where truth lovingly steps forward. This is the space I hear the wisdom in a voice that is not mine, and merge with a strength that sometimes I forget is always there. This is the same place I know without question, my legacy, my purpose and the divine truth that we ALL are miraculous beyond measure, primed to divinely give and receive with all of our beautiful relations, if we can remember, if we can feel and know deeply two very simple things. We are never, ever alone, and we absolutely need each other.

~ Misa Terral

Embodied Attention

Frederic Terral

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Distraction. The necessity of our our humanly devices, which have now become the heartbeat of our humanly tasks, have us in our heads nearly All. Day. Long. As a result, we’ve become busier, more distracted and more disconnected from the immediate world around us. Ironic, isn’t it? How our devices can show us, teach us, and connect us to this amazing world we live in, but disconnects us from the most important thing that keeps us grounded: our mindfulness to the present, and the awareness of our breathing body.  

Despite our best intentions, we will always find our way back to thinking, doing, solving, watching, texting, scrolling, fixing, or numbing. Do we notice the angst arising within us from too much head space, too much screen time, too much stress and anxiety? Maybe the truest test of how we evolve in our human journey, is how well we tend to ourselves gently and lovingly when we feel the severence of our mind, body, and spirit.

One simple practice can help. It’s faster than running, cheaper than hot yoga, and more accessible than forest bathing. It is the simple practice of Embodied attention. Embodied attention is more than tuning in to the senses, but feeling how our body responds to everything we see, hear, touch, and taste. It’s savoring the space we occupy and the our relationship with the swirling, sensory experience around us. Embodied attention can be a practice of reverence if we come alive to the wonder and awe of every detail. We don’t just see, but we feel the colors in the room, the way the light hits the walls, the sounds coming from our surroundings. We begin to notice what our breath is doing— does it slow down, does it speed up, or are we holding it? When we look out a window and notice the way the trees shake in the wind, or a bird swoops, what does our body do—what does it want? Can we stay with the senses, can we stay with our body without going back in our thoughts? Without judgement or the need to fix?

We can make anything into a waking meditation by giving our bodies the space, intention and attention to feel the energy of a moment. Embodied attention reminds us we are a living organism that needs sun, water, and movement to feel alive. When we remove thought and judgement, gratitude naturally tends to fill the spaces. Gratitude is not just an idea, it is a real emotion that radiates and feeds our cells from inside out. We know we need experiences to connect us to all that is greater than what’s in the palm of our hand or a screen on the desk. We need more earth, wind, water, fire, more green. We need more uninhibited wildness.